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Author Topic: How is checkout throughput calculated?  (Read 2886 times)

r3tailworker

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How is checkout throughput calculated?
« on: 17-10-19, 03:52PM »
At the moment our throughput is below target, and before giving any of my staff warnings I would really love to know how throughput is calculated. Is there a formula?

I think it’s a bit unfair penalising staff based on a figure generated by a computer that no one can explain to me?

Walker

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #1 on: 17-10-19, 03:59PM »
There is no target for checkout throughput, at least as far as individual checkout workers are concerned.
« Last Edit: 17-10-19, 04:00PM by Walker »

madness

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #2 on: 17-10-19, 04:02PM »
If its the same as other retailers i have worked for then its the time the first item of a transaction was scanned to the last one and total being pressed.  in Tesco it ranges from 200-600. In the discounters 800 would have you sacked.

 But tesco is about service and chatting to the customer not effeciency

Iv'e never heard of any presure put on cashiers at tesco for throughput speed though.


r3tailworker

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #3 on: 17-10-19, 04:09PM »
I’ve always been told that throughput is calculated using the scan rate, idle time, and tender time?

taliahad

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #4 on: 17-10-19, 04:10PM »
Please don't go making your staff's lives even more miserable than they are already.  Is soul destroying sat at a till for hours at a time, I know this because I've done it. 

If you want to get the best out of your staff, support them.  Checkout operators go at the speed of their customers and customers don't want their cornflakes and cat food hurtled down the slope at them and they don't want to feel under pressure to pack faster than they are able. 

This is one of the things that really annoys me about tesco, they expect their staff to give excellent service, engage in small talk with the customer, whether the customer wants it or not and somehow do it at the speed of a lidl operator, who gives little more than a curt politeness.   Poor staff are paid a pittance and can't win, no wonder everyone hates the company so much. 

If you want to get the best out of your staff, want them to help you out, when you need helping out then go easy on them. 

rayinski

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #5 on: 17-10-19, 04:38PM »
I agree with taliahad,

One of the main reasons the customers in my store keep coming back is because we don't rush them through the till. If my shift leader or manager ever tried to give me a let's talk or a disciplinary based on my through rate when I'm scanning, I'd get them to do a day in my shoes.

Some of the staff in my store hate the fact that they have to get off their tills and do some other work when we are not busy, me? I love it, I don't like the fact the queue's are longer at the tills, but there's nothing I can do about that, so I concentrate on what I can do and that's give my customers the best possible service.

r3tailworker

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #6 on: 17-10-19, 06:36PM »
I agree with everyone whose commented on this, but I just want to know the formula they use to make up the throughput. Someone must know it somewhere?

Morris999

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #7 on: 17-10-19, 07:02PM »
I’ve always been told that throughput is calculated using the scan rate, idle time, and tender time?

Your correct it is the above, however each store will have different targets for all of the above and also for throughput.
If you go on repot centre it will give you the targets for each of scan rate, idle time, tender time and throughput for your store.
If you then go to print manager you will find each cashiers results for each one of them per day and week.
Cannot remember off the top of my head whereabouts in print manager it is but not to hard to find.

Please also remember that if they go on basket till they will never hit throughput while on it, also you will have to take into account the time of day and day of the week too that each cashier works as that will also effect each cashiers throughput!
Everything you need to know is in the IDQ toolkit which is available on click2order and help centre.

A final note as long as your store is hitting the weekly IDQ figure I wouldn’t be to bothered about throughput, service is more important.
My store hits the stores throughput every week, yet fails IDQ most weeks!
Hitting throughput is no automatic guarantee of passing IDQ.

r3tailworker

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #8 on: 17-10-19, 10:24PM »
We aren’t passing our IDQ every week, but I believe that to be more to do with the 13 ish staff that have left our store which haven’t been replaced.

Redshoes

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #9 on: 18-10-19, 07:00AM »
Idle time is a bigger issue. It's time when you need to get colleagues off the tills to support the shop floor. In times gone by you used to be able to claw back IDQ by just having people sat on tills but now it won't do that, you need to be serving.
In my store we have an aisle we look after we face/tidy as and when we can. It's close for if we are called back but it's works better depending on who is team support.
If you are failing IDQ mornings and afternoons but pass in the evenings for example, you have colleagues in at the wrong times. Look at trends where you pass or fail and target overtime into where you are failing.

Siwel123

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #10 on: 18-10-19, 09:33AM »
Surprising to hear that some checkout departments actually come off the tills to support the shop floor as ours sit and watch as the shopfloor crumble   ;D .

Call me

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #11 on: 18-10-19, 12:12PM »
We also have checkout staff that just sit there waiting for customers to serve , but they do have health problems , so that they are unable to work on shopfloor.

taliahad

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #12 on: 18-10-19, 12:56PM »
Tesco is such a strange company, there is another thread somewhere that mentioned staff in their store receiving punishments for leaving their tills to help customers. 

checkoutmonkey

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #13 on: 18-10-19, 05:18PM »
Yeah, my store will have all till trained staff sat on a checkout doing nothing if we are failing IDQ. I’ve tried to explain to senior team that having people sat on tills wont bring back IDQ unless they’re actually serving but it falls on deaf ears. So everyone gets annoyed because they can’t get their work done as they’ve been told they have to sit on an empty till for hours instead. And our staff are categorically never allowed to get off their tills to help out. It’s such a bizarre system that is so inefficient

NightAndDay

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #14 on: 18-10-19, 06:39PM »
Managers not listening to people, only at Tesco do you have ding dongs in that sort of position.

londoner83

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #15 on: 18-10-19, 09:15PM »
Still maintain IDQ is of no relevance in 2019.

Firstly you could choose to have .Com and no queue. However if you decline and come instore, in extras you have the further choice of Self Scan, Scan as you shop or a manned till.

So if you as a customer choose to join a queue at a manned till (that costs more to operate) rather than do it yourself why should we pander to you if you have a few minutes wait?

Obviously we dont want queues halfway down the aisle but waiting behind 2 customers with baskets/shallow trollies isnt really a issue.

darklighter

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #16 on: 18-10-19, 11:14PM »
Customers should get a discount for scanning their own shopping, believe it or not, some will not use self-scan because they believe it is putting someone out of a job and come the day RFID is a viable, cheap alternative, then all checkout operators will be defunct without question or exception.
« Last Edit: 18-10-19, 11:20PM by darklighter »
 

Welshie

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #17 on: 18-10-19, 11:23PM »
Seriously Londoner83 !! If you think we're "pandering " to customers by serving them , you're really in the wrong job .

Redshoes

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #18 on: 19-10-19, 03:40AM »
Old habits die hard. IDQ used to be called "one in front", you could cheat that. We are told not to chase a figure but if we look after service we will pass IDQ. We are not expected to pass for very customer, we can't. You can't chase a service figure by being idle, you can only improve it by actually serving people. I have wondered about the hub with this, all new cameras and will it make a difference. I have also wondered about "wait time" as that is the new measure in metro stores.

NightAndDay

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #19 on: 19-10-19, 10:35AM »
I'm of the opinion that the economy shouldn't hold technology back, self serve tills don't take jobs away from people, it frees up resources so that the workers can be deployed elsewhere.

Amazons no checkout stores is the future for brick and morter retail, technology above all else, adapt or die.

randomworker

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #20 on: 19-10-19, 06:54PM »
It has nothing to do with the economy and all to do with customer choice if they want to use self service or the checkouts. I use checkouts sometimes, I use self service sometimes and I use home delivery sometimes.

londoner83

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Re: How is checkout throughput calculated?
« Reply #21 on: 20-10-19, 11:42AM »
You misunderstood the point I was making.

 My point was if scan as you shop and self serve both have numerous empty tills yet you choose to stand in a queue with your basket of 4 items to be served by a cashier you are actually choosing to queue when you have the choice not to.
Of course there may be many reasons why a customer chooses to do so, and we as a business should respect that decision. Many customers willingly wait for their favourite cashier as they like the service they get, or wont try and use anything they feel is taking people's jobs away. Both are fully justified positions.

However IDQ was designed at a time when people did one weekly shop often filling a deep trolley and yes being behind 2 or 3 other customers would often cause a 5 minute delay at tills so opening more closed tills improved service.

Today with more frequent shopping by the majority of our customers (baskets/small trollies) even having 5 customers in front of you just buying a meal deal could still lead to you being served in a few minutes.

As a business surely it's better to focus on managing wait time, than to chase a measure that's become outdated. If you go in the discounters there are often queues and no-one bats a eyelid.