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Very Little Helps => Stores => Topic started by: Iron Giant on 30-08-19, 09:18AM

Title: Access To Evidence
Post by: Iron Giant on 30-08-19, 09:18AM
If invited to an investigation should you have access to any evidence prior to the meeting or will the meeting itself be the first opportunity to see it?
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: NightAndDay on 30-08-19, 10:05AM
Meeting itself will be the first opprtunity to see it, if however they say they have evidence, but don't present it during the investigation and then proceed to discipline you, you can request to see the evidence (in most cases) under the freedom of information act and also raise a grievance for out of process investigation.

Investigations also have a note taker, in my experience, the notes they write contradict everything you say, after the meeting you' should be given an opportunity to review the notes, if not add that to your grievance as out of process.
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: Cleaner1 on 30-08-19, 01:23PM
Do managers have to delete names from statements if they are given to a person under investigation?
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: SameOld on 30-08-19, 02:45PM
Yes, there is a redaction process.  Unfortunately its followed poorly though
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: Cleaner1 on 30-08-19, 03:49PM
SameOld

Beautiful!  :-*
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: Loki on 12-09-19, 06:33AM
Do managers have to delete names from statements if they are given to a person under investigation?

No they cannot delete the names if those names are witnesses and/or relevant to the case. Any personal information relating to the names that are not relevant to the case are redacted.
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: Rad on 12-09-19, 08:30AM
I don't think this is quite right.  If there are fear of reprisals any details including their name can be redacted.
However the person being investigated might not be able to defend themselves against a mystery witness.

Unless I've misunderstood the latest redaction policy.
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: Expressdude2016 on 12-09-19, 02:53PM
Meeting itself will be the first opprtunity to see it, if however they say they have evidence, but don't present it during the investigation and then proceed to discipline you, you can request to see the evidence (in most cases) under the freedom of information act and also raise a grievance for out of process investigation.

Investigations also have a note taker, in my experience, the notes they write contradict everything you say, after the meeting you' should be given an opportunity to review the notes, if not add that to your grievance as out of process.

Freedom of information act is for public sector not businesses.
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: NightAndDay on 12-09-19, 03:14PM
Sorry, my mistake, I meant the data protection act.
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: Loki on 13-09-19, 02:21PM
I don't think this is quite right.  If there are fear of reprisals any details including their name can be redacted.
However the person being investigated might not be able to defend themselves against a mystery witness.

Unless I've misunderstood the latest redaction policy.

I’m aware of such scenarios... but these, in my experience, are very rare. And even if the name were redacted where there were legitimate concerns of reprisals, a Tribunal would disclose the names.

Excluding such rare cases, what I have stated is correct.
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: Rad on 13-09-19, 03:21PM
Whether the case is rare or not, if a colleague wants their name redacted for fear of reprisals, they can.
Title: Re: Access To Evidence
Post by: Loki on 13-09-19, 05:35PM
If genuine yes. They have to provide clear rationale for that my friend. Not as simple and straightforward as you imply it to be. I can tell you that from experience from both sides of that argument.